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Rare map that bolstered Philippines’ case in territorial dispute with China sold for $1 million

Posted by on Sep 15, 2019 in Blog | Comments Off on Rare map that bolstered Philippines’ case in territorial dispute with China sold for $1 million

Rare map that bolstered Philippines’ case in territorial dispute with China sold for $1 million

MANILA – A copy of a rare map that helped bolster the Philippines’ case against China in a dispute over the South China Sea was sold on Saturday (Sept 14) for 40 million pesos (S$1.06 million). The price was nearly four times what a tech executive had paid for another copy at a Sotheby’s auction in London in 2014. Mr Mel Velarde, chief executive of local telco NOW, bought his copy for 12 million pesos. The map was expected to fetch at least 18 million pesos. A four-minute bidding war among two art collectors inside the gallery and a third one bidding via a proxy pushed the price to 40 million pesos. Ms Lori Juvida, a gallery owner, tendered the winning bid. She later told The Straits Times it was “for a friend”. His identity has not been disclosed but he is believed to be a Chinese Filipino. Mr Jaime Ponce de Leon, the director of Leon Gallery, where the auction was held said: “The strength of its price is its rarity and its historical significance… As a document of history, it is very important.”  He said it helped that the map had figured prominently in a case the Philippines brought before the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague in 2013 challenging China’s claim to over two-thirds of the South China Sea. The map, first published in 1734 by the Jesuit cartographer Pedro Murillo Velarde, was among 270 maps presented to a five-man arbitration tribunal to back the Philippines’ rights to parts of the South China Sea that China was also claiming. It drew Scarborough Shoal – referred to back then as Panacot – as part of the country’s territories. The shoal lies just 358km west of the Philippines’ main Luzon island. The United States eventually mediated a deal. Both sides agreed to withdraw from Scarborough. The Philippines pulled out its ships. But China stayed, and later sealed off the entire atoll. The tribunal in The Hague sided with the Philippines and struck down in 2016 China’s claim to the South China Sea. It concluded that land features, not historic rights, determine maritime claims, and ruled that the “nine-dash line” encircling two million sq km of the South China Sea on modern Chinese maps is illegal. It upheld the Philippines’ rights to over 200 nautical miles of “exclusive economic zone”, which included Scarborough. China, however, has ignored the ruling. Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte raised the case with China’s leader Xi Jinping when he visited China last month. But he was told China would not change its position on the matter. His spokesman Salvador Panelo later said the two leaders “agreed to disagree”, and that Mr Duterte would no longer bring up the ruling with Mr Xi. The 1734 map is by itself an important historical artefact. It was engraved by printer Nicolas de la Cruz Bagay on eight copper plates. The plates were captured by Britain when it occupied Manila from 1762 to 1764, and taken to England as war booty. The University of Cambridge used the plates to print copies of the map before the plates were “rubbed down” and re-used to make other maps. The copy auctioned on Saturday had belonged to the Duke of Northumberland. Fewer than a dozen copies of the map exist today....

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UnionBank of the Philippines

Posted by on Mar 11, 2019 in Blog | Comments Off on UnionBank of the Philippines

UnionBank of the Philippines

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Consulate Of Spain

Posted by on Feb 21, 2019 in Blog | Comments Off on Consulate Of Spain

Consulate Of Spain

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PSE, PAGCOR, Australian Embassy

Posted by on Feb 18, 2019 in Featured | Comments Off on PSE, PAGCOR, Australian Embassy

PSE, PAGCOR, Australian Embassy

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Philippine Stock Exchange, Inc Map turn Over

Posted by on Jan 31, 2019 in Blog | Comments Off on Philippine Stock Exchange, Inc Map turn Over

Philippine Stock Exchange, Inc Map turn Over

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PAGCOR map turn over

Posted by on Jan 23, 2019 in Blog | Comments Off on PAGCOR map turn over

PAGCOR map turn over

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Australlian Embassy Map Turn Over

Posted by on Dec 14, 2018 in Blog | Comments Off on Australlian Embassy Map Turn Over

Australlian Embassy Map Turn Over

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Map rights wrongs: The 1734 Murillo Velarde map

Posted by on Oct 1, 2018 in Blog | Comments Off on Map rights wrongs: The 1734 Murillo Velarde map

Map rights wrongs: The 1734 Murillo Velarde map

China never controlled the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) at any time in history, as proven by the 1734 Murillo Velarde map.   According to Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonio Carpio, the map invalidates China’s Nine-Dashed Line and claims of ownership of the South China Sea for over “2,000 years. Carpio delivered the keynote address at the opening of the 16th Philippine-Spanish Friendship Day Conference on Oct. 4 at the auditorium of the National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development (NISMED). The 2-day conference had the theme “Mapping Spaces and Identities in Spanish Colonial Philippines.” Official. Printed in Manila, the 1734 Murillo Velarde map by the Jesuit priest Pedro Murillo Velarde, was the Spanish government’s official map of its territories (both terrestrial and aquatic) in the Philippines. Called the mother of all Philippine maps and widely copied by Filipino and European cartographers, the map showed the maritime routes from Manila to Spain and Mexico and other Spanish territories to the New World, something very vital to the Galleon Trade, the first global trade by sea. According to the National Library of Spain, the map was drawn by Filipino Francisco Suarez and engraved by another Filipino, Nicolas dela Cruz Bagay. “The map is so detailed that when a magnifying glass is used, one can see all the towns and pueblos of the Philippines in 1734,” Carpio said. He was part of the team that argued before the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) at The Hague in the Netherlands on the Philippines’ claim on the Sea. Included in the 1734 Murillo Velarde map are the Panacot shoal (Scarborough Shoal) and the Los Bajos de Paragua (Spratly Islands or Spratlys). It was one of the 270 ancient maps presented at the PCA hearings contesting China’s claim over the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) that began in July 2015. Among the other maps presented were ancient maps of China  throughout the Chinese dynasties, Philippine ancient maps and maps of Southeast Asia and European maps of Asia. China’s historical claim that it owned the South China Sea since 2,000 years ago (ed: roughly around the time of the Han Dynasty which began from 206 BC – 220AD) was refuted by Carpio and the Philippine team of experts. He said none of the ancient maps showed that China owned the contentious waters nor the Spratly islands and the Scarborough Shoal. The ancient Chinese maps’ southernmost territory was Hainan. “China in its earliest dynasty, from the Song and fast forward to their last dynasty, the Qing dynasty, and all their maps uniformly show that their southernmost territory is Hainan. So we presented this to the Tribunal. If you superimpose all the maps from the Song to the Qing dynasty, to over almost a thousand years, the southernmost territory of China was Hainan,” he said. No historical claim. The Nine-Dashed Line is the demarcation line China used to claim the major part of the South China Sea. China maintains it owns any land or territory contained within the line. Among the territories claimed are the Spratlys and Scarborough shoal. The demarcation line was formerly 11 dashes. In his book “The South China Sea Dispute: Philippine Sovereign Rights and Jurisdiction in the West Philippine Sea,” Carpio explained that in December 1947, the “Kuomintang Government of China...

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Mobile Marine and Naval Centrum

Posted by on Sep 25, 2018 in Blog | Comments Off on Mobile Marine and Naval Centrum

Mobile Marine and Naval Centrum

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Highlights of International Conference on Cartography in Philippine History (May 23, 2018)

Posted by on Jun 22, 2018 in Featured | Comments Off on Highlights of International Conference on Cartography in Philippine History (May 23, 2018)

Highlights of International Conference on Cartography in Philippine History (May 23, 2018)

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